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Author Topic: Rapid prototyped wizzzer tips  (Read 2614 times)

ta0

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Rapid prototyped wizzzer tips
« on: March 09, 2013, 11:01:49 AM »

An auction on Ebay is offering replacement tips for vintage wiz-z-zers. It makes sense as those tips are many times broken or missing.  It seems that with decades of exposure to the air the rubber dries or oxidizes and the tips become fragile and disintegrate when you try to spin them (I know from personal experience  :( ).  If they were kept in an air sealed package they seem to survive (at least they don't change color). No doubt, the replacement tips will add a lot of value to vintage wizzzers with missing tips.

These are replicas made with rapid prototyping.  It is claimed that: "it is a 90 shore a runner to ensure a long durable life and to put up with abuse the originals couldn't."  I have my doubts, additive manufacture is not know for the strength of the parts (the shore number is just a measure of hardness not toughness). Anyway, the interesting thing is that this is the wave of the future.  One day we will have 3D printers in our homes and just print a top instead of ordering it   8)
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kyo

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Re: Rapid prototyped wizzzer tips
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2013, 12:58:00 PM »

I have a 3d printer on my desk now, and I printed a top a few days ago :)

The materials used for printing these days have gotten quite durable.. it's ABS plastic, so as long as you take care in your design it works fine.

Kyle
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ta0

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Re: Rapid prototyped wizzzer tips
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2013, 10:34:16 PM »

I received a set of these tips today. He actually sent me a free extra one. It took him a few days to ship, but I guess he doesn't make them until you order (one of the beauties of the technology).

I was pleasantly surprised. They have a serrated hole that matches well the axle of the vintage wizzzers  so you can just slip it on without the need of glue.  On the pictures they look porous but in reality they are solid. 

I gave one a good workout, spinning a top as fast as I could.  I did it on wood, plastic, tile and smooth concrete.  The tip took it well.  There was just a very slight rubber track left on some surfaces, so they should last long.  But I guess most buyer of these tips will be collectors (or sellers to collectors) so I doubt most will be played this rough.

If you have some vintage wizzzers with missing tips, I can recommend these replacements. Note that current wizzzers made by Duncan are smaller and these tips won't fit.
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