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 1 
 on: Today at 09:03:22 PM 
Started by Jeremy McCreary - Last post by Jeremy McCreary
Boo! You cannot call it a piñata then! >:(
If you need to sacrifice a few gears to celebrate surviving the 2020 pandemic, so be it. It's worth it! (specially is you make a video for us  >:D )
PS: It looks really nice!

Okay, okay, I'll take the gears off and then break it open. The other parts are cheap.

 2 
 on: Today at 08:22:38 PM 
Started by Jeremy McCreary - Last post by Jeremy McCreary
One by-product of the lockdown might be fathers getting seriously into beyblades :o ;D ;D ;D

Or worse: Just heard that Colorado gun sales are at an all-time high. Guessing that's largely because of all those zombie apocalypse movies. Then there's the enemy within, working on your last nerve. >:D

 3 
 on: Today at 07:49:24 PM 
Started by Jeremy McCreary - Last post by ta0
Boo! You cannot call it a piñata then! >:(
If you need to sacrifice a few gears to celebrate surviving the 2020 pandemic, so be it. It's worth it! (specially is you make a video for us  >:D )

PS: It looks really nice!

 4 
 on: Today at 07:43:48 PM 
Started by Jeremy McCreary - Last post by ta0
One by-product of the lockdown might be fathers getting seriously into beyblades :o ;D ;D ;D

 5 
 on: Today at 07:29:08 PM 
Started by Iacopo - Last post by ta0
As always from you, a thought-provoking experiment presented very cleanly with a professional quality video.

I would say that although the orbit could be said to precess, this precession is unrelated to the precession of a top. I don't think you can use it to explain gyroscopic precession.

I would say it's more related to nutation, in the sense that a perturbation creates oscillations around the plane of equilibrium, which in this case is the vertical plane (due to the strong centrifugal force). 

 6 
 on: Today at 06:22:53 PM 
Started by ta0 - Last post by Jeremy McCreary
I have seen and own off brand gibbs style tops from japan, some identical except for paint and launcher.

Ah, so the starters do detach. That makes a lot more sense. Nice tops!

 7 
 on: Today at 06:07:51 PM 
Started by Jeremy McCreary - Last post by Jeremy McCreary
The LEGO company just asked members of its official adult user groups to come up with building projects for families to do together while stuck at home -- especially projects with educational value.

So I'll be submitting these fun little battle tops on the theory that after being cooped up with family for days on end, it's better to go after their tops than their throats. (You know you want to.)

https://youtu.be/X82rzFteZdk

Any arena will do, but as in bei, you get a lot more action on surfaces with a little sag in the center. As detailed here, battle tops pose some interesting design trade-offs.

In it's 60+ years as a construction toymaker, LEGO's offered only a handful of official top-related sets -- most of them in just the last few years under the names "Spinjitzu" and "Airjitzu", and rarely with decent spintop performance. Maybe this submission will give them some ideas.

 8 
 on: Today at 05:48:03 PM 
Started by ta0 - Last post by Texture
I have seen and own off brand gibbs style tops from japan, some identical except for paint and launcher.


 9 
 on: Today at 04:19:54 PM 
Started by Iacopo - Last post by Iacopo
This is not strictly spin top related.
It is a simple experiment about the gyroscopic motion;

I hung up a little piece of rod to a string, and I attached the other end of the string to a rod mounted on a rotary tool, (a lathe in the second and third sequences: here I rotated the image by 90 degrees to fill better the screen, the real spin axis was horizontal, not vertical).
The video shows that blowing air to the spinning system starts a precession.
So, even a simple little weight attached to a string can perform the gyroscopic motion.
If I knew this sooner, I would have used this example to explain the gyroscopic motion in my old video;
it would have made the explanation a bit easier because it can be analyzed like the trajectory of just one single mass point, (the center of mass of the piece of rod), instead of the cloud of mass points of a whole precessing flywheel, which can be more confusing.

Note that the spin is counterclockwise and the precession is clockwise, they have opposite directions, differently from what it happens in spinning tops, where they have the same direction;  this is because the forces causing the precession are reversed;  in precessing spinning tops, the lower side of the flywheel wants to go down, because of gravity.  The little weight attached to the string, when in the video it is in the lower part of its trajectory, wants to go up instead, pulled by the centrifugal force.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5w1CQxTSaSM

 10 
 on: Today at 11:55:39 AM 
Started by jim in paris - Last post by Jeremy McCreary
As I suspected, it is all mechanical in spite of the "magnetic" adjective. The egg has a weight on the larger side, but no magnet. It remains touching the top just by the dynamics of the movement.

Which in my book is even cooler.

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